gogreen Packaging

FIELD RESEARCH

Panera
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Variety of materials 

All major chains use a combination of paper, lined paper, and plastic. Grease requires paper to absorb.

Stacking and handling

Employees and consumers need to be able to comfortably grab the package, put food inside, and put it in a bag.

Confusion around composting

For the few companies that are composting, people don’t know what can or cannot be put into the bin.

Utilitarian

All pieces have the same experience, no matter the price point. There is little differentiating the packaging from one place to the next.

Unable to recycle

While many contents are recyclable, there are few areas where you can recycle or compost effectively. In this example, the company offers recycled materials but not a bin for recycling.

OPPORTUNITY AREAS

Use the material it where it makes sense – salads, milkshakes, to-go containers for high-end grocery stores.

Create a great “unboxing experience.” This should signal some luxury while providing short term utility.

It needs to be easy to fit into a compost bin at home. These are smaller than the average trash can.

It should be obvious to the consumer that it’s compostable and differentiated from plastic.

AESTHETIC DIRECTION

The updated Lunchable.

A natural design.

Geometric, a feeling of new and the future.

BRAINSTORM

DESIGN CRITERIA

  • modular
  • tells a story of progress
  • recognizable
  • customer understands how to dispose of it
  • fits small compost bins

PROTOTYPING

TECHNICAL INSIGHTS
  • material must smoke before it can form
  • height should be 2″ or less
  • draft at 10 degrees was effective
  • sharp edges crack material easily
  • ribbing is critical for strength
  • three pieces together maintained strength
 

RENDERINGS

  • large pieces can be broken apart to fit into small compost bins
  • lid is attached¬†
  • ribbing provides strength
  • go green logo embossed into the lid

RECOMMENDATIONS AND NEXT STEPS

The structure of today’s compostable options technically suite most companies. The challenges are cost-effectiveness and keeping compost receptacles uncontaminated.

The next steps are to test different packages, bins, and teaching methods in order to reduce contamination.